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An Introduction to Graphology

Graphology - the study of handwriting and handwriting analysis - is now an accepted and increasingly used technique for assessment of people in organization. Handwriting analysis is an effective and reliable indicator of personality and behaviour, and so is a useful tool for many organizational processes, for example: recruitment, intervieWing and selection, team-building, counselling, and career-planning.This is a free introductory guide to graphology, and a free handwriting analysis tool pdf download, with examples of techniques that graphologists and handwriting analysis experts use to analyse a person's personality from a sample of handwriting.

Theory and History

A person's handwriting - the script - and its placing on the page express the unique impulses of the individual: logically, the brain sends signals along the muscles to the writing implement they control. By examining a handwriting sample, an expert graphologist is able to identify relevant features of the handwritten script, and the way the features interact. The features, and interaction between them, provide the information for the analysis. (No single handwriting sample will exhibit all 300 different features of course - a typical analysis will involve far less).No single handwriting feature proves anything specific or absolute by itself; a single feature alone can only identify a trend. It is the combination of features, and the interaction between them that enable a full and clear interpretation.

Handwriting Features

As previously stated there are around 300 features - this introductory article attempts to explain some of the basic ones that can be readily understood and which give interesting information.

Slant

Right slant indicates a response to communication, but not how it takes place. For example, the writer may wish to be friendly, manipulative, responsive, intrusive, to sell, to control, to be loving, supportive, just to name some possibilities.

Size

Right slant indicates a response to communication, but not how it takes place. For example, the writer may wish to be friendly, manipulative, responsive, intrusive, to sell, to control, to be loving, supportive, just to name some possibilities.


Pressure

Heavy pressure indicates commitment and taking things seriously, but if the pressure is excessively heavy, that writer gets very uptight at times and can react quickly to what they might see as criticism, even though none may have been intended. These writers react first and ask questions afterwards.

Upper zone or case (as in l, t, h, etc)

Tall upper strokes are reaching towards goals and ambitions or, if they are very extended, there may be unrealistic expectations of what the person feels they must achieve.

Lower zone (as in g, y, p, etc)

Lower loops are also varied and have different meanings. For example a straight stroke shows impatience to get the job done. A 'cradle' lower stroke suggests an avoidance of aggression and confrontation. A full loop with heavy pressure indicates energy/money-making/sensuality possibilities, subject to correlation with other features.

Middle zone or case (as in a, c, e, etc)

These middle zone shapes can give some particularly interesting information. The middle zone in the script represents the ego - from it we get a lot of information as to how the writer feels and acts in public settings - what makes them tick socially and at work. Some people's handwriting consists of only one single style, but many people will have a mixture of two handwriting styles or more

Related Materials
  • BENZIGER'S PERSONALITY TYPES AND THINKING STYLES THEORY
  • EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ)
  • ERIKSON'S PSYCHOSOCIAL THEORY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
  • KOLB'S LEARNING STYLES THEORY
  • MASLOW'S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS
  • MCGREGOR'S X-Y THEORY, AND WILLIAM OUCHI'S THEORY Z
  • MCCLELLAND'S ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION THEORY
    • GENERATIONAL NICKNAMES MODEL/THEORY
    • PERSONALITY THEORIES AND TYPES
    • FREE PERSONALITY TESTS

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